Skin Lesion - Treatment and Prescriptions

What is Skin Lesion?

A skin lesion is an abnormal growth or colored area on the skin. Because “skin lesion” is a general term used to describe basically any growth or color change, there are a seemingly endless list of skin conditions that are considered skin lesions. Therefore, the following discussion about skin lesions will be about the common or significantly important types of growth. After all, skin lesion growths like skin cancer could be dangerous and life threatening. Differentiating between benign and malignant is an important job of professionals, and a single picture to a dermatologist could reveal a mysterious growth to be a life threatening emergency. Here are some skin lesions one could have:
  • Mole (nevus)
  • Skin tags
  • Cyst
  • Lipoma
  • Angioma
  • Dermatosis papulosa nigra
  • Actinic keratosis
  • Seborrheic keratoses
Our care team will help you achieve your perfect health! With thousands of hours of in-person and digital clinical experience treating skin lesions, we know what works, and at costs that won’t break the bank. Skin lesions can be dangerous, but not to worry, the doctor can see you now.
SEE A DOCTOR

Photos


Actinic keratosis on elder man's head. It is caused by excessive sun exposure. Actinic keratosis affecting the arm of an elderly patient. Reducing sun exposure is the best treatment for actinic keratosis. Cherry Angioma found on older patient's skin. A collection of blood vessels inside the angioma is the cause of the red color. Cherry Angioma found on older patient's skin. A collection of blood vessels inside the angioma is the cause of the red color. A sac-like pocket of membranous tissue that contains fluid, air, or other substances that formed a cyst on the hand of a patient. A patient has a lipoma on his arm. It is a slow-growing, fatty lump that's most often situated between your skin and the underlying muscle layer. It is typically not cancerous. Mole on the back of a neck. A mole is typically formed in adolescents by a cluster of pigmented cells, which gives it the brown appearance on the skin. Mole on a patient's skin. A mole is typically formed in adolescents by a cluster of pigmented cells, which gives it the brown appearance on the skin. Seborrheic keratosis growing on a patient skin is almost always non-cancerous. Seborrheic keratosis often appears on the face, chest, shoulders, or back. It has a waxy, scaly, slightly elevated appearance. No treatment is needed for this type of skin disease. Seborrheic keratosis growing on a patient skin is almost always non-cancerous. Seborrheic keratosis often appears on the face, chest, shoulders, or back. It has a waxy, scaly, slightly elevated appearance. No treatment is needed for this type of skin disease. Seborrheic keratosis growing on a patient skin is almost always non-cancerous. Seborrheic keratosis often appears on the face, chest, shoulders, or back. It has a waxy, scaly, slightly elevated appearance. No treatment is needed for this type of skin disease.

Symptoms

These skin conditions have something in common: they all look suspicious enough to look like skin cancer, but they’re just benign skin lesions. It's scary to think that one day, a growth could appear and you have no idea what it is or what could happen with it. Our dermatologists commonly check patient’s suspicious growths for signs of skin cancer. These check ups are well justified because melanoma is one of the most common forms of life threatening cancers. If you’re suspicious about a growth, don’t hesitate to ask a dermatologist because 97% of people survive melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer, if caught early. The following list of diseases are commonly under suspect:
  • Mole (nevus) – a harmless dark brown or black spot or bump that appears anywhere on the body usually during childhood or adolescence
  • Skin tags – a harmless, small piece of soft hanging skin that is flesh colored or brown
  • Cyst – a harmless, sac-like bump under the skin that can appear anywhere on the body
  • Lipoma – a mostly harmless, soft, doughy, slow growing lump originating under the skin
  • Angioma – a harmless, red, mole-like skin growth
  • Dermatosis papulosa nigra – harmless, small black bumps on face
  • Actinic keratoses – a rough, scaly patch of skin in sun exposed areas that could turn into skin cancer
  • Seborrheic keratoses – a harmless that could be a brown, white, black, round, oval, patchy, or waxy bump with a “pasted on” look

Causes

Since skin lesion is a broad term, the causes between each kind of lesion is typically significantly different than the next.
  • Mole (nevus) – Skin cells producing pigment (melanocytes) grow in clusters.
  • Skin tags – Unknown.
  • Cyst – A sac-like pocket fills with fluid or another substance due to duct blockage, disease, infection, or inflammation.
  • Lipoma – It is unknown why, but fat cells overgrow into a lump under the skin.
  • Angioma – It is unknown why, but blood vessels overgrow to form angiomas.
  • Dermatosis papulosa nigra – Unknown, but the darker one’s skin, the more likely one would get it.
  • Actinic keratoses – UV rays from sun exposure and tanning damage skin over time, and the accumulation of that damage causes abnormal skin growth.
  • Seborrheic keratoses – Unknown.

Treatment

There aren’t very many prescription or over the counter medications to deal with these skin conditions. The most important thing to do is check suspicious skin issues by a dermatologist. If it's harmless, the condition can remain on your face with no consequences aside from cosmetic ones. Therefore, there aren’t prescriptions to deal with these benign skin lesions. If its dangerous, then the next step can be advised with priority treatment as a medical emergency.

Home Remedies

While home remedies have taken on popularity, there are little to no studies confirming the effectiveness of such treatments. In some cases, it might even do more harm than good considering their minimal effectiveness versus the unknown side effects they could have on your body. It’s best to follow the medical advice of a dermatologist because they know what will or will not treat the disease. Here are some popular home remedies that you should be careful with:
  • Tea Tree Oil
  • Apple Cider Vinegar

Over the Counter Medication

While some over the counter (OTC) medications are effective enough to be given as prescriptions, other OTC medications have limited effects on disease. They might help for mild to moderate cases, but they aren’t usually effective on severe ones. If used incorrectly and without guidance, they might even prove to be ineffective and produce unforeseen side effects. However, a dermatologist can tell you whether or not these can be effective for you. Here are some OTC medications that may or may not be included in a treatment plan given by one of our dermatologists:
  • Chemical peels – Exfoliates skin to increase skin cell turnover to bring healthier skin up which could take care of certain growths like actinic keratoses.

Prescription

Prescriptions, alongside professional medical advice, are the most effective form of treatment. Home remedies and over the counter treatments take plenty of time, energy, and money, yet are uncertain to work. Our experienced dermatologists take your unique skin, set of symptoms, and medical history into account to take the guessing game out of your road to recovery. Here are some prescriptions your dermatologist might include in your personalized treatment plan:
  • Topical therapy – Chemotherapy drugs and other topical medications stunts growth or breaks down abnormal tissue from actinic keratoses.
If you have a suspicious growth, it’s important to seek the advice of a dermatologist to find the next steps. If your growth is determined to be dangerous, it might be best to have the growth removed by a dermatologist and have it heal with minimal damage to the look of your skin. Our dermatologists can help you determine what is the right course of action for your situation. Never worry about a suspicious growth again. See one of our dermatologists to put your mind and body at ease.
SEE A DOCTOR

Post Treatment Prevention

After being seen by one of our SkyMD dermatologists, you’ve been equipped with the treatment plan and prescription(s) to treat your discomfort. However, disease can be persistent, so you have to be too. A skin care routine and a set of disease-preventing habits recommended by our dermatologists are essential for long term prevention. Here are some popular prevention strategies that could supplement your personalized treatment plan:
  • Wear sunscreen to reduce the likelihood of UV induced actinic keratoses and certain skin discoloration lesions

Ready to submit your first visit on SkyMD?